(Source: vogue-pussyxo)

asylum-art:

Roger Ballen /Die Antwoord
The Photographers Gallery za in Cape Town had planned to host Roger Ballen’s Boarding House exhibition in 2010. This particular series had been on view at most of the major art centres across the world. What was of particular interest was the announcement of a major Roger Ballen exhibition at the Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town during 2010 as well. This was a first retrospective of his work at this art museum. Once the date for the museum exhibition had been confirmed it was also made clear by the museum director, Mr. Riason Naidoo, that no associated commercial exhibition would be permissible during the duration of the museum show. Thus, the Photographers Gallery za had to cancel its long-planned solo exhibition. It was a disaster. Because the 2011 schedule had been confirmed, there were no slots available to postpone the exhibition to a later date. A better strategy soon emerged: cancel the Boarding House solo exhibition completely and start planning a new exhibition. It was during this upheaval when Ballen mentioned, almost in passing, that he had done some work with the musical duo, Die Antwoord.
asylum-art:

Roger Ballen /Die Antwoord
The Photographers Gallery za in Cape Town had planned to host Roger Ballen’s Boarding House exhibition in 2010. This particular series had been on view at most of the major art centres across the world. What was of particular interest was the announcement of a major Roger Ballen exhibition at the Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town during 2010 as well. This was a first retrospective of his work at this art museum. Once the date for the museum exhibition had been confirmed it was also made clear by the museum director, Mr. Riason Naidoo, that no associated commercial exhibition would be permissible during the duration of the museum show. Thus, the Photographers Gallery za had to cancel its long-planned solo exhibition. It was a disaster. Because the 2011 schedule had been confirmed, there were no slots available to postpone the exhibition to a later date. A better strategy soon emerged: cancel the Boarding House solo exhibition completely and start planning a new exhibition. It was during this upheaval when Ballen mentioned, almost in passing, that he had done some work with the musical duo, Die Antwoord.
asylum-art:

Roger Ballen /Die Antwoord
The Photographers Gallery za in Cape Town had planned to host Roger Ballen’s Boarding House exhibition in 2010. This particular series had been on view at most of the major art centres across the world. What was of particular interest was the announcement of a major Roger Ballen exhibition at the Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town during 2010 as well. This was a first retrospective of his work at this art museum. Once the date for the museum exhibition had been confirmed it was also made clear by the museum director, Mr. Riason Naidoo, that no associated commercial exhibition would be permissible during the duration of the museum show. Thus, the Photographers Gallery za had to cancel its long-planned solo exhibition. It was a disaster. Because the 2011 schedule had been confirmed, there were no slots available to postpone the exhibition to a later date. A better strategy soon emerged: cancel the Boarding House solo exhibition completely and start planning a new exhibition. It was during this upheaval when Ballen mentioned, almost in passing, that he had done some work with the musical duo, Die Antwoord.
asylum-art:

Roger Ballen /Die Antwoord
The Photographers Gallery za in Cape Town had planned to host Roger Ballen’s Boarding House exhibition in 2010. This particular series had been on view at most of the major art centres across the world. What was of particular interest was the announcement of a major Roger Ballen exhibition at the Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town during 2010 as well. This was a first retrospective of his work at this art museum. Once the date for the museum exhibition had been confirmed it was also made clear by the museum director, Mr. Riason Naidoo, that no associated commercial exhibition would be permissible during the duration of the museum show. Thus, the Photographers Gallery za had to cancel its long-planned solo exhibition. It was a disaster. Because the 2011 schedule had been confirmed, there were no slots available to postpone the exhibition to a later date. A better strategy soon emerged: cancel the Boarding House solo exhibition completely and start planning a new exhibition. It was during this upheaval when Ballen mentioned, almost in passing, that he had done some work with the musical duo, Die Antwoord.

asylum-art:

Roger Ballen /Die Antwoord

The Photographers Gallery za in Cape Town had planned to host Roger Ballen’s Boarding House exhibition in 2010. This particular series had been on view at most of the major art centres across the world. What was of particular interest was the announcement of a major Roger Ballen exhibition at the Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town during 2010 as well. This was a first retrospective of his work at this art museum. Once the date for the museum exhibition had been confirmed it was also made clear by the museum director, Mr. Riason Naidoo, that no associated commercial exhibition would be permissible during the duration of the museum show. Thus, the Photographers Gallery za had to cancel its long-planned solo exhibition. It was a disaster. Because the 2011 schedule had been confirmed, there were no slots available to postpone the exhibition to a later date. A better strategy soon emerged: cancel the Boarding House solo exhibition completely and start planning a new exhibition. It was during this upheaval when Ballen mentioned, almost in passing, that he had done some work with the musical duo, Die Antwoord.

asylum-art:

3D gif by Dain Fagerholm

Dain Fagerholm aka DAiN 8 is an artist currently living in Seattle, Washington. Dain works mostly with ink pens and colour dye markers and started making what he calls ‘stereographic gifs’ of his drawings in February of 2012. He was most recently award the ‘Most Mesmerizing [GIF] or [PIC] of 2012.Drawings 

asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  
These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.
asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  
These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.
asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  
These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.
asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  
These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.
asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  
These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.
asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  
These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.

asylum-art:

The Gruesome Works of Naoki Sasayama  

These paintings by Naoki Sasayama recount, in stark realism, gruesome destruction and deaths.  Sasayama’s work is dealing with the facets of life and includes allusions to social and cultural ideas.  His technical ability and craving for the complex are also in the upper echelons making for a secure position of someone doing something no one else is doing.

(Source: jonwithabullet)

asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.



asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer



Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.






She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.






In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.

asylum-art:

Heidi Taillefer

Heidi Taillefer’s work is an original creative fusion of classical figurative painting, surrealism, contemporary realism, and mythology combined with popular figurative traditions ranging from Victorian romanticism to science fiction.     Her artwork is consonant with some of the 20th century surrealists such as Max Ernst, and Girogio DeChirico.

She addresses eternal issues on the human condition borrowing from mythologies throughout different eras and cultures, through the lens and language of mechanism, mirroring the ubiquity of technological advancement in the world.

In her work she attempts to marry primordial human essence with the explosive expansion of the machine, as a new paradigm looms close on the horizon and promises a redefinition of what it means to be human.

asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett
ELiza Bennett  is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 
via empty kingdom

asylum-art:

ELiza Bennett

ELiza Bennett is a London based artist who recieved a BTEC National Diploma in art, focusing on textiles. She then continued to pursue a BA in Fashion Design at Middlesex University.

Eliza creates visual narratives with her pieces. Using her hand as a canvas, ” A Woman’s Work is Never Done” is a self-inflicted sculpture. These worn looking hands are a representation of how hard a women’s work truly is. Using thread and needle, which are traditionally considered feminine materials, she brings light to the struggles of low paid jobs such as cleaning and caring. This piece I must admit makes my skin crawl a little, but the message the work portrays and the crafting of it are truly beautiful. 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read 

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe 

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.Read

asylum-art:

Drawings Of Floating Bodies by Artist Leah Yerpe

Brooklyn-based artist Leah Yerpe‘s charcoal drawings depict the true beauty and joy of movement. Her work somehow captures the both the constrains of human anatomy, and also the freedom we can experience in our own bodies. Her figures are twisted, but graceful; tightly bound, but free. Her figures’ faces are typically obscured, which leaves their expressions and emotions a mystery. Their poses could represent pain or ecstasy. They could be falling or flying. They overlap like elements in a collage, but the larger image is one of cohesion as bodies blend together to create beautiful new forms.
Read
"

And heroin boy started taking off his belt,
Started taking off his pants,
Started taking off his shoes
Started filling up the bathtub
Getting ready to go in for a swim
I says “No-o.
You’re going to drown.
He says ‘No,
I can’t drown.
Simply because…

Shhhhhhh.

A man destined to hang
Can never drown,
A man destined to hang
Can never drown,
A man destined to hang
Can never ever drown.

A man destined to drown
Can never burn,
A man destined to drown
Can never burn,
A man destined to drown
Can never ever burn.

A man destined to fry
Can never ever ever
A man destined to fry
Can never ever ever
A man destined to fry
Can never ever ever die…
In any other way but frying,
Lucky that I’m dying
By hanging and not drowning.

So now that we’ve got that straight
Can’t I just be left alone?
I want to take a fuckin’ bath

"
— "Daniel Cowman"//Regina Spektor

sharhk:

did you fall from heaven bc so did satan